Published On: Sri, tra 13th, 2022

Subway suspect Frank James once posted chilling video from packed train

Brooklyn mass shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.

The troubled 62-year-old — who was arrested Wednesday after a massive manhunt — posted the eerie, 47-second clip in July 2020 to his social media, which was full of violent threats and support for black power leaders.

They included rants about Mayor Eric Adams — forcing Hizzoner to get beefed-up protection — while also gloating about heroic NYPD cops shot dead on duty.

The subway clip shows a finger just in front of the camera as it slowly scans the crowded subway car, slowly pointing toward oblivious straphangers.

As he does so, his voice slowly mumbles, similar to how witnesses say the shooter did after he set off a smoke bomb and shot 10 people, also injuring 19 others, on the Manhattan-bound N train during rush hour Tuesday.

Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Frank James posted a photo of dozens of bullets with the caption, “Nothing says FU better than some of these FU.”
Frank James suspect of rush hour attack on the N train subway attack in Sunset Park.
Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train.
Facebook images from the page of Frank Whitaker- aka Frank James the man sought in connection with shooting 10 inside the N train at the 36th.st. subway station in Brooklyn.
Frank James posted rants about Mayor Eric Adams.

“This is actually freaking me out,” one recent viewer wrote, while another called it “creepy AF.”

The clip, called “The good ole days,” was recorded in August 2020, James explained in the comments.

However, James’ regular social media posts appear to show him fantasizing about killing people for years.

Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Frank James’ social media is filled with violent threats and support for black power leaders.
Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
In August 2020, Frank James posted a disturbing photo of a blue body bag on a gurney.

In one 2019 post, he shared a meme saying, “I like you … I think I will kill you last.”

One of his last Facebook posts before Tuesday’s carnage was a photo of a man pointing a gun straight at the camera, which he shared Friday.

Another post this month showed the bloodied, gun-carrying hand of the assassin from the video game Hitman Absolution, about a killer hunted by cops for “pursuing redemption in a corrupt and twisted world.”

Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Frank James celebrated actual violence, posting a photo of heroic NYPD cops Jason Rivera, 22, and Wilbert Mora, 27, who were shot dead during a Jan. 21 domestic call in Harlem.
Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Frank James recently also posted a photo of teen Kenosha gunman Kyle Rittenhouse.

James — who says he is a native New Yorker in his videos — also celebrated actual violence, posting a photo of heroic NYPD cops Jason Rivera, 22, and Wilbert Mora, 27, who were shot dead during a Jan. 21 domestic call in Harlem.

“NYPD under attack dam shame,” he wrote.

The cops’ deaths — which led to an unprecedented turnout for their funerals — was also a topic for many of James’ lengthy rants on YouTube in which he claimed to be a “Prophet of Truth.”

Frank James was initially named a person of interest.
BOLO for Frank Robert James..
Frank James was officially declared a suspect on Wednesday.

In one, he sympathized with the cops’ shooter,  career criminal Lashawn McNeil, suggesting he was only carrying out the purpose that a racist society had pushed him into.

“What can you expect?” he titled a Feb. 1 rant, blaming the “stereotypes” that “whit motherf–kers” have of all black men.

“Nothing else is encouraged, except violence,” he insisted. “I’m expected to be violent, I’m expected to be a criminal, and when I’m not there’s something wrong with me,” he claimed.

Emergency personnel gather at the entrance to a subway stop in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Tuesday, April 12, 2022.
Emergency personnel gather at the entrance to a subway stop in Brooklyn, Tuesday, April 12, 2022.
The NYPD is investigating a possible explosion in the subway in Brooklyn Tuesday morning, police said.
The shooting broke out around 8:30 a.m. at the 36th Street station in Sunset Park.

“That’s enough to make you want to hurt somebody,” he warned ominously.

Other posts showed him celebrating black power leaders like Angela Davis and Malcolm X, with James more than 30 years ago wearing a T-shirt of the soon-to-be-slain black nationalist leader holding a weapon.

He also shared an image of controversial late Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad, using his preferred title as “The Messenger of Allah.”

Other photos showed he was angry about rising gas prices — posting a photo of someone paying $50 — while also expressing homophobia.

Frank James’ regular social media posts appear to show him fantasizing about killing people for years.
Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Photos showed Frank James was angry about rising gas prices.

“Love your neighbor,” one meme he shared said, before adding, “He’s gay, never mind.”

James rarely posted anything upbeat, save in 2013 when he shared news that he had won $5,000 in a New Jersey Lottery.

Instead, he mostly made clear he had death and violence in mind for years.

In August 2020, he posted a disturbing photo of a blue body bag on a gurney, saying it was the rightful place “FOR EVERYBODY THAT WANTS TO PUT ME IN MY PLACE.”

A day later, he posted a photo of dozens of bullets with the caption, “Nothing says FU better than some of these FU.”

Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Many of Frank James’ disturbing messages hinted at his personal thoughts of violence.
Brooklyn mass-shooting suspect Frank James once posted a chilling video from another packed Big Apple subway train — slowly pointing his finger at passengers as if picking out targets.
Frank James’ posts made clear he had death and violence on his mind for years.

He recently also posted a photo of teen Kenosha gunman Kyle Rittenhouse, writing, “And a child should lead them.”

Like many of his posts, that led to a flurry of comments after Tuesday’s outrage, with one writing of Rittenhouse, “Too bad Kyle wasn’t on that train to blast your ass.”

Many of his disturbing messages hinted at his personal thoughts of gun violence.

“You may not be able to beat ’em but you can sure as hell shoot ’em,” said a meme he re-shared in October 2020, four years after first posting it.

“Of all things remember this … every motherf–ker respects a gunshot wound,” another meme shared the same month said.

In March he reposted a meme he first shared five years earlier, saying, “They say the pen is mightier than the sword, I say the bullet is mightier than both them.”

“Please don’t make me prove it,” James warned.

James’ Facebook page was finally taken down just after 1 p.m., with a spokesperson for the platform’s parent company Meta confirming to The Post that it was “removed in line with our policies.”

His YouTube channel went down about an hour earlier, with a message saying, “This account has been terminated for violating YouTube’s Community Guidelines.”

Such action is nothing new for James, who revealed in a video last month that at least four of his channels under various “Profit of Doom” monikers had been removed because “YouTube has found a way to deal with people like me.”

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